When you think about it, Valentine’s Day goes way beyond paper hearts and candy! Think about all of the relevant science activities for Valentine’s Day! The human heart experiments, love potions, growing crystal hearts, and so much more! I love the Valentine’s Day Science Experiments Using Milk because they’re easy to do and teach real scientific concepts.

– Life Over C's Valentine Magic Milk Experiment

Recommended Grade Level:

Valentine STEM Magic Milk Supplies:

  • Milk-whole or 2 percent (about 1 cup)
  • Food coloring
  • Liquid dish detergent
  • Cotton swabs or cotton balls
  • Shallow dish

Science Experiments with Milk and Food Coloring

VALENTINES SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS

MAGIC MILK SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS GIVE KIDS GREAT MEMORIES AND BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE FOR FUTURE SCIENCE PROJECTS.

Starting early with science experiments capitalizes on the thing that ALL young learners have: CURIOSITY!

There are so many home science experiments to do with your kids, starting at a young age! You can make play dough, play with the effects of vinegar drops on baking soda, fill different size/shape containers with colored water, or simply play in the dish bubbles!

All of those early science explorations are so valuable. To kids, they’re just a fun way to make a hot mess! As children grow, teachers and parents can introduce some of the reasons behind all of this scientific magic.

I love demonstrating this rainbow milk science experiment to the whole class first. Then, I set up supplies for small groups of students to roll up their sleeves and get hands-on with science!

Although it can be a little scary for parents and teachers to let things get a little messy, I highly encourage you to do so. We all know the value of hands-on learning!

Ask questions as children try the Valentine’s Day science activity:

  • What do you see happening when you add the food coloring to the surface of the milk?
  • How does it change as the soap molecules race around the milk?
  • Would it be different if you used skim milk?
  • What important role does the food coloring play?
– Life Over C's Red dye in milk in a heart-shaped container

Magic Milk Science Experiment for Valentine’s Day

SCIENTIFIC EXPLORATION WITH YOUNG LEARNERS
ASKING STUDENTS THOUGHTFUL QUESTIONS IS AN IMPORTANT STEP DURING AND AFTER THEY COMPLETE THE EXPERIMENT:

The milk, food coloring, and dish soap science project for kids teaches lots of valuable vocabulary and concepts. Introduce what your students are ready for, depending on their age and interest:

  • Milk contains minerals, proteins, and fats
  • Proteins and fats can change when other substances are introduced
  • When you add dish soap to the milk, it breaks the surface tension of the milk
  • The dish soap molecules try to attach to the fat
  • When the soap attaches, it creates a burst of color
  • The movement stops when all of the fat has been found by the soap
– Life Over C's Dropping Dawn dish soap into milk with food coloring

Why Is It Important For Kids To Do Science Experiments?

Besides the fact that kids love experimenting with various materials, there are many other reasons you should get scientific with your child.

Teaches the Scientific Process: Simple experiments teach the order of the process we use for all scientific inquiry. As children grow and learn, they can apply the same process to more complex experiments.

Develops Curiosity: Asking questions, proposing hypotheses, and testing theories contribute to overall curiosity about the world. The more practice kids have with questioning and experimenting to find results, the stronger the foundation will be for future inquiry.

Improves Observational Skills: Any science experiment requires the ability to observe. Early explorations help children build better observational skills, which apply to many areas of life including social skills, communication, and learning other curricular subjects.

Expands Problem Solving: The questioning and testing required of science experiments ultimately improves the ability of children to solve problems. This kind of higher order thinking will benefit children in all areas of life and future learning.

Materials needed for Valentine’s Day Science Experiments Using Milk:

  • Milk-whole or 2 percent (about 1 cup)
  • Food coloring
  • Liquid dish detergent
  • Cotton swabs or cotton balls
  • Shallow dish
– Life Over C's Supplies for making a magic milk experiment

How To Perform the Marbled Milk Experiment

MILK EXPERIMENTS WITH PRESCHOOLERS AND KINDERGARTNERS
ASKING STUDENTS TO PREDICT WHAT WILL HAPPEN WHEN YOU ADD FOOD COLORING, THEN SOAP, TO THE MILK IS AN IMPORTANT FIRST STEP IN THE ACTIVITY.

First, gather the necessary supplies for each group to be able to easily conduct the experiment.

Steps in the Valentine’s Day magical milk procedure:

  1. Pour the milk into the shallow dish so that it covers the bottom.
  2. Add several drops of food coloring to the edges of the milk, choosing the colors you like.
  3. Dip a cotton swab/ball into the dish soap.
  4. Place the swab into the middle of the dish to activate the food coloring molecules.
– Life Over C's Food dye reacting to the soap in milk

Extend the Activity:

Play with Color: Turn this entire experiment into one of color mixing. Use the primary colors (red/blue/yellow) to make the secondary colors (purple/orange/green).

Alter Ingredients: Use different types of soap, a different type of milk, or perhaps candy hearts to see how the results change (or don’t).

Record the Results: Extend this fun experiment across the curriculum by having students write/draw a prediction. Then, have them record the results.

Do you love this activity?

Pin it for later!

– Life Over C's Valentine Magic Milk Experiment

More Activities You’ll Love:

author avatar
Kim Staten Owner and Curriculum Designer
Kim Staten is a mother of four children ages 20, 19, 16, and 12. Kim has taught at the preschool, kindergarten and early elementary levels for 16 years. With extensive experience working with special needs children, including her own children with special needs (Rett Syndrome, autism, anxiety, and ADHD), she creates hands-on curricula and activities that are great for working with children of all abilities in the classroom and at home. Hands-on, accessible activities are her passion. 

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