There are so many amazing ways to explore the alphabet with preschoolers, it truly boggles my mind! But in the best way possible! I love, love creating fresh ways for young learners to begin exploring letter identification, sound identification, letter formation, and letters in general. These engaging activities form a crucial foundation for learning to read. I mean it! Crucial!

Photo collage showing a printable alphabet book for kids to color.

Recommended Grade Level:

Alphabet Books Supplies:

  • Printer/Ink
  • Paper Cutter
  • Stapler
  • Crayon/Pencil/Marker

Free Printable Alphabet Books for Preschoolers

ALPHABET LESSON PLANS FOR preschoolers

LEARNING THE ALPHABET LETTER NAMES AND SOUNDS IS THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS FUTURE READING SUCCESS. ITS IMPORTANCE SHOULD NOT BE UNDERESTIMATED!

Alphabet letter activities in preschool should introduce those funny shapes that each have their own special name and sound. Activities should be varied throughout the school year, as well as hands-on, to allow for much tactile exploration.

I like to differentiate preschool alphabet printables as much as possible by only giving the students what they can be successful with without feeling frustrated or overwhelmed.

I would introduce the free printable alphabet activity for preschool as a whole group and then meet with small groups of students to work on it so I can be sure they complete each page correctly.

Once students are comfortable with all of the activities for each letter of the alphabet, I would place some of the pages at the literacy center for students to work on independently.

This alphabet activity for preschoolers printable is jam-packed with a variety of pages for each letter. Each page targets the skill in a different way and lends itself to different types of learners:

  • First sound pictures to identify orally and color
  • Uppercase and lowercase letter identification
  • I Spy letter identification page with dot markers
  • Rainbow writing page for each upper and lowercase letter
  • Dot marker page with large upper and lowercase letters
  • Roll and write preschool alphabet tracing pages for each letter
  • Color and read page with sight words and repeated text, “I see the…”

Using the Alphabet Books to Teach Letters

TEACHING LETTERS TO preschoolers

PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN STUDENTS NEED LOTS OF REPETITION WHEN LEARNING THE LETTERS. MANY CHILDREN REQUIRE A WHOLE LOT MORE THAN A SET OF FLASHCARDS OR SOME COLORING PAGES.

Preschool teachers can use a variety of alphabet books for preschoolers, printable activities, letter matching activities, magnetic letters, and more to expose students to letters in lots of different ways.

Here are some helpful tips for young learners:

  • Break up the alphabet. When students can accurately name sets of five to ten letters, introduce a few more.
  • Instill writing habits early by talking about the lines used to form the letters, where they start, and whether they are straight, diagonal, or curved.
  • Talk about the idea that letters have names and sounds. When students know all (or most) of the letter names, begin to introduce the sounds.
  • Start letter identification with what they know, like their name!
  • Be patient! This is a whole new ‘language’ for young children. They will learn with plenty of repetition, games, activities and varied free alphabet printables for preschool.

Building Letter Fluency with Printable Alphabet Books

Teaching letter names is sort of like feeding kids fruits and vegetables! We know it’s an important component of producing healthy readers. It also contributes to other important skills.

Unlock the Code: When children learn letters, they learn that the words we speak are related to the letters on the written page. This is the first step in unlocking the code of reading those letters.

Develop Automaticity: It’s really important for kids to be able to fluently identify letters in different contexts in order to be able to begin to read.

Increase Curiosity: The more children work with letters and learn the function of letters, the more eager they will become to read! A little motivation goes a long way toward producing great readers.

Visual Discrimination: Children really have to look at the individual shapes and lines of each letter to discern between the letters and to match the uppercase/lowercase version of each letter.

How to Make the Alphabet Books for Preschoolers

Step One:

Print the letter recognition printable.

Step Two:

Cut each page into four sections. Staple the pages together.

Step Three:

Get busy! Children can color, identify letters and sounds, and play the alphabet games on any given page.

You could also just use the pages you like, instead of stapling the pages into little booklets. For example, if your students can’t get enough do-a-dot marker activities, just give them those pages. You could do one page a day for 26 days!

Sequencing Cards: Use one each of the rainbow writing or dot pages to challenge students to put the letters in ABC order.

Scavenger Hunt: Pick your favorite page, then hide letters around the room for students to find and match with the lowercase version.

Letter Matching: Print the rainbow writing letter pages on card stock and laminate. Then, use them as a large letter matching game.

Sensory Bin: Choose a letter, then hide items in the sensory bin that begin with that sound.

Connect a Book: Share a book like, “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom,” by Bill Martin, Jr. to pique students interest before introducing the letter books.

Celebrate Letters: Choose a letter each week and have a celebration! Maybe students wear clothes that begin with that letter, or you plan special snacks based on beginning sounds.

Free Printable Alphabet Books Featured Image
join the newsletter & Get your free activity

Get Your Free Printable Alphabet Books Here

Already a subscriber? No worries. Just enter your email here to have the activity sent directly to your inbox.

More Activities You’ll Love:

author avatar
Kim Staten Owner and Curriculum Designer
Kim Staten is a mother of four children ages 20, 19, 16, and 12. Kim has taught at the preschool, kindergarten and early elementary levels for 16 years. With extensive experience working with special needs children, including her own children with special needs (Rett Syndrome, autism, anxiety, and ADHD), she creates hands-on curricula and activities that are great for working with children of all abilities in the classroom and at home. Hands-on, accessible activities are her passion. 

Similar Posts